Is a flipped classroom a beneficial approach to instruction?

Is a flipped classroom a beneficial approach to instruction

Is a flipped classroom a beneficial approach to instruction

For several years, I employed the flipped classroom in my high school math classrooms, and I found it to have numerous advantages. Here are some ideas for putting the strategy into practice that will make it more effective and entertaining for both you and your students

Do not make the films a homework assignment. Students are intended to watch educational films at home before engaging in more effective instructional activities at school, according to one of the major benefits of the flipped classroom. It’s a wonderful idea, but I noticed that many of my students couldn’t or wouldn’t view the videos at home, which threw a kink in my plans for the next day’s lessons. As a result, I’ve recently begun screening the films in class.

Because the videos were short (5–10 minutes), the amount of time spent in class was modest, and I always knew that all of my pupils had seen them. (Plus, having my lectures on the video provided a slew of other advantages.)

Each video should be under 10 minutes long. This may seem difficult at first (“How can I cut this material?”). It’s critical that my kids hear me speak about this!”), but trust me when I say that if your video is longer than 10 minutes, you should split it into two parts. Your kids will lose interest if your movies are too long, so keep them short and sweet.

Make movies with your students as well. Although student recordings may not make it into your video lecture library (though I did have a couple), they’re a terrific alternative for assessments and student projects. When students have to explain a concept on video, it’s astonishing how much they learn.

 

Why are flipped classrooms becoming popular?

Everyone must learn the same way in formal schooling. I am a strong believer in public education, but I am also aware of its shortcomings.

Traditionally, a speaker instructs students in school or college, with textbooks as a supplement. This is ideal for those who want to learn from a lecturer, who want to ask questions as they go along, and who are adept at taking notes or remembering… However, this is not how most people learn. That is the type of instruction your daughter seemed to like. Everyone learns in their own unique way, and regrettably, the teacher is forced to follow a single general style and try to accommodate as many students as possible.

The lecturer records themselves teaching in a flipped classroom, and students view the lectures as homework. The students then complete puzzles in class to assess their comprehension of the content, with the teacher filling up the blanks. A flipped classroom has a number of advantages.

  1. The instructor can improve and reuse the lectures.
  2. The teacher can work with students one-on-one to assist them in better understanding what they’ve learned.
  3. Students have the option of watching and rewatching lectures at their leisure.

If your daughter is having difficulties in this situation, attempt to figure out why. Is she unable to attend the lectures because she is pressed for time? or does she have a question that she is unable to ask the instructor right now? Maybe other pupils can learn a lot more effectively in this manner, so your daughter isn’t getting any worse, and everyone is improving? Or it could be something completely else… I can’t say for sure because I’m not a scientist. Understanding why she’s having trouble in this situation could lead to a solution.

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Is it true that pupils learn more successfully in a flipped classroom?

Although there is a lot of study on the flipped classroom, each researcher defines it differently.

Several meta-analyses (studies that combine the findings of multiple trials) suggest that there is a considerable improvement in learning—but it is minor.

The flipped classroom concept is that students come to class prepared and are engaged and working in groups during class time. The group atmosphere encourages participation, and peer instruction may be effective.

In other words, the flipped classroom is another phrase for ‘active learning,’ which means that instead of sitting and receiving information to remember, the student is an active participant who practices the discipline’s skills and procedures.

As is customary, the devil is in the details.

It is possible to enthrall students without ensuring that they learn anything.

Active learning activities must be properly planned, whether in a flipped classroom or elsewhere. “We’re trying something different to help everyone learn more, and we need your support and input to obtain the greatest outcomes and make it worth everyone’s time,” the student should ideally be involved as a partner.

Some students detest being moved away from their usual study habits of taking notes and spitting out answers on exams.

I’ve seen professors who conduct 20 minutes of active learning: she walks the students through an activity, encouraging them to work in groups on an issue and help develop viable answers.

She then inquires as to whether or not the pupils would like a traditional lecture. When they reply yes, she gives a 20-minute speech before asking, “Any questions?” When there are no more questions, she assigns a problem to the pupils that no one can solve.

She then leads a conversation with the students about why they THINK they are learning from a lecture when they are unable to address the type of problem that requires the knowledge they just heard about.

After the professor hears from the students that “hearing it is not enough,” she returns to active learning—after the students agree that it is a good idea.

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How to make the flipped classroom more successful and fun for the students?

For several years, I employed the flipped paradigm in my high school math classrooms, and I found it to have numerous advantages. Here are some ideas for putting the strategy into practice that will make it more effective and entertaining for both you and your students:

Do not make the films a homework assignment. Students are intended to watch educational films at home before engaging in more effective instructional activities at school, according to one of the major benefits of the flipped classroom. It’s a wonderful idea, but I noticed that many of my students couldn’t or wouldn’t view the videos at home, which threw a kink in my plans for the next day’s lessons.

As a result, I’ve recently begun screening the films in class. Because the videos were short (5–10 minutes), the amount of time spent in class was minimal, and I always knew that all of my students had seen them. (Plus, having my lectures on the video provided a slew of other advantages.)

Each video should be under 10 minutes long. This may seem difficult at first (“How can I cut this material?”). It’s critical that my kids hear me speak about this!”), but trust me when I say that if your video is longer than 10 minutes, you should split it into two parts. Your kids will lose interest if your movies are too long, so keep them short and sweet.

Make movies with your students as well. Although student videos may not make it into your video lecture library (though I did have a few), they’re a great option for assessments and student projects. When students have to explain a concept on video, it’s astonishing how much they learn.

 

What is a “flipped classroom”?

Traditional classrooms are the polar opposite of flipped classes.

Students in flipped classes studied by watching videos at home before doing their tasks and clarifying their doubts with the teacher at school.

In typical classrooms, the teacher instructs a group of 30-40 students at the same time. After the lecture, the teacher assigns homework or tasks to pupils, which they must complete at home before being checked in a class by a teacher.

Traditional classrooms now have a number of issues:

  1. The ability of students to learn or grasp things is uniform. Some pupils grasp concepts quickly, while others may require more time.
  2. It is possible that one student considers what the teacher is teaching them to be too simple, while another student understands after the teacher has taught him. Another pupil, on the other hand, may get disoriented and unable to comprehend what the teacher has just said.
  3. Some kids were unable to do their homework because no one was accessible to assist them at home.
  4. When a teacher instructs a class, the majority of students are occupied with taking notes on what the teacher is saying. As a result, they occasionally miss parts of the lecture.
  5. Students may miss lessons due to illness, sports, or unforeseen circumstances, necessitating make-up classes.

To address all of these flaws, a new concept known as a flipped classroom has been proposed. Students in a flipped classroom hear a recorded lecture online on their own time before doing their ‘homework’ in class. They also have the option of watching the videos again while working on their tasks.

Assignments are accomplished in these types of classrooms rather than at home. “Schoolwork at home and homework at school,” we can simply say for flipped classrooms.

 

The following are some of the benefits of flipped classrooms:

  1. Students can learn at their own pace and at any moment before the next class using the online lectures.
  2. Students can pause or rewind lectures, jot down questions, and discuss them in class with their lecturers and peers.
  3. By having video lectures available online at all times, students who are unable to attend class due to illness, sports, vacations, or other unforeseen circumstances can swiftly catch up.
  4. Students in flipped classrooms learned content at home and then applied it in class. As a result, the interaction between the student and the teacher improves. It also encourages students to try different approaches to the same task.

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Difference of  flipped classroom from a traditional classroom

In a “traditional” classroom, the instructor gives a lecture from the front of the room, while the students sit in their chairs and take notes.

The instructor frequently rotates around the room while the students work on problems in a “flipped” classroom.

(One of the prerequisites for teaching a flipped class is that the teacher is physically capable of moving around the room.) This is a prerequisite for both physical space and physical health: not all instructors can manage a flipped classroom, and not all places are suitable for it.)

 

Is it possible to apply the flipped classroom in our educational system?

Yes, it is possible. Teachers can use the flipped classroom paradigm to make the most of the most precious yet rare learning resource: time.

The most common misperception regarding classroom flipping is that it’s all about the videos. Khan* has faced a lot of criticism from educators, who claim that his films are pedagogically ineffective and only good for mechanical procedures. Educators can give a variety of resources for at-home learning, including videos. “Educators are no longer the guardians of knowledge,” as one teacher put it. As we move away from old educational essentialism paradigms, the role of the teacher will be reinterpreted (a teacher-centric learning environment).

Class time is freed up for project-based learning, contemplation, or peer-to-peer mentoring when teachers provide numerous tools for at-home comprehension. It transforms into a vibrant, student-centered learning environment. Differentiated education, small group work, and individual assessments are now possible for teachers.

This paradigm corresponds to Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences, which suggests a more expansive learning potential and educational perspective. Rather than expecting each student to modify his or her learning style to suit the needs of a curriculum, the curriculum is customized to match the learning styles of each student.

 

Why is a flipped classroom effective?

Class time is used for class discussions, and readings are assigned to cover the topic matter. If students have questions regarding the subject matter after reading the textbook and/or other assigned papers, the teacher can provide a more in-depth explanation during class.

Labor economics was my first graduate course, and it was taught by an adjunct faculty member who was a former state department economist. He’d spent his career at several US embassies in South America, so he knew a lot about the subject, but he didn’t know how to educate. He basically read the textbook to us during the first class. We put our brains together and devised a strategy. We spent the next week researching the topic in order to discover instances in South America.

Someone asked him about the example when he first arrived in class, and he spent the next couple of hours discussing the topic with us, citing real-life examples. We got a lot more out of the class discussion than we would have gotten out of a well-informed lecture.

Because class time is more effectively employed for class discussions and answering student queries in flipped classrooms, they are more effective. It also encourages students to read the textbook before class.

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